The argument was real, the math was wrong and I was the Karen. But hear me out.

The potatoes were sort of a last minute "we don't have enough food" decision on my part, reasonably early on Thanksgiving. We were preparing for a very casual, early afternoon meal at Aunt Corky's where everyone in attendance brought whatever they felt like eating for their Thanksgiving meal. (That was my bright idea.)

We already had beautifully crafted, slow cooked ribs and custom made Black and White Cookies to share for dessert.

Anyway, I decided at the last minute to just cook a pan full of Au Gratin potatoes from a box. Or boxes, really. Two different size boxes. The first box was normal size and the second box was DOUBLE the size of the first box, labeled "Family Size". No problem.

No problem until you look at the math, realize it does NOT simply double from small box to larger box and then kind of lose your mind about it.

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Nobody else in your vicinity will care about this mathematical issue, I can assure you. Bringing it up repeatedly in different word combinations and varying degrees of amazement will not convince your significant other that the poor math conversions are a serious issue.

When that same significant other entertains your insanity for a solid 90 seconds, leave it at that. Don't continue the frustrating conversation any further. They will not be convinced to have the same level of concern that you do.

"BUT TOTALLY DIFFERENT SIZE BOXES BOTH CALL FOR 3/4 CUP OF MILK!!!"

How can this be? Why? What do I do? Do I 'fix' this mistake for them? Did Idahoan screw up their own recipe? Am I the first person to catch such an earth shattering mistake? My culinary skills and sharp eye MUST be brought to their attention!

Here's a tip: Idahoan doesn't answer the phone on Thanksgiving. I know this because I called them. (In my defense, it was later in the day after returning home and a couple of drinks. It sounded much funnier in my own head.)

It's perhaps my only saving grace of the entire potato matter, that I didn't bore some lovely customer service rep with my witty and incredibly intelligent discovery. (But seriously...Idahoan screwed up their recipe.)

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From product innovations to major recalls, Stacker researched what happened in food history every year since 1921, according to news and government sources.