To be honest, this isn't anything new. There are a couple of stereotypes in Bozeman that area are actually quite fitting. Here they are. First, everyone drives a Subaru. The second stereotype is that everyone owns a black lab.

I recently sold my pickup and bought a Subaru. Let's face it, a Subaru is a great choice in a place like Bozeman. The all-wheel-drive is a blessing in the winter, and they get decent gas mileage to boot. I also happen to be the owner of a black lab named Galena. That means I'm official proof that it isn't entirely a stereotype, but it's fairly accurate.

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You literally can't drive down any street in the Bozeman area without spotting at least one Subaru parked along the side of the street. Bozeman is home to a lot of Subaru owners, and for good reason. They are incredibly reliable vehicles and can handle almost any weather conditions. If you opt for the Outback or the Forester, there's plenty of cargo space for storage and you can even lay down the seats and camp in the back if you ever need to.

Bozeman is also home to a lot of pet owners, specifically dogs. If you hike on any trail in the area, you'll see the evidence. Little poop bags everywhere! It's been a problem in Bozeman for quite a while.

Black labs and labrador retrievers, in general, are popular breeds here in Bozeman. If you go to any dog park or trail in the area, you're almost guaranteed to see at least one.

I've heard the stereotype for a long time, but now I'm officially a part of it now. I just think it's funny. What are some other Bozeman stereotypes that you think are accurate?

LOOK: Here are the pets banned in each state

Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to states, some organizations, including The Humane Society of the United States, advocate for federal, standardized legislation that would ban owning large cats, bears, primates, and large poisonous snakes as pets.

Read on to see which pets are banned in your home state, as well as across the nation.

LOOK: Here Are 30 Foods That Are Poisonous to Dogs

To prepare yourself for a potential incident, always keep your vet's phone number handy, along with an after-hours clinic you can call in an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a hotline you can call at (888) 426-4435 for advice.

Even with all of these resources, however, the best cure for food poisoning is preventing it in the first place. To give you an idea of what human foods can be dangerous, Stacker has put together a slideshow of 30 common foods to avoid. Take a look to see if there are any that surprise you.