In a recent Facebook post, the National Park Service said that you shouldn't run from bears, or push your slower friends down in attempts of saving yourself.⁣⁣

The National Park Service says that if you come upon a stationary bear, move away slowly and sideways. Doing this will allow you to keep an eye on the bear and avoid tripping. Moving sideways is also non-threatening to bears.

Whatever you do, do not run. If a bear begins to follow you, stop and hold your ground. Bears a similar to dogs, meaning that they will chase fleeing animals.

The NPS also advises to not climb a tree. Both grizzlies and black bears can climb trees.⁣⁣

In addition to the the tips above, The NPS says that you shouldn't push a slower friend down in front of the bear, even if you think the friendship has run its course.
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Stay calm and remember that most bears do not want to attack you; they usually just want to be left alone. Don't get too close, and ⁣⁣identify yourself by making noise so the bear knows you are a human and not a prey animal.

Help the bear recognize you as a human. Using your voice is recommended. The bear may come closer or stand on its hind legs to get a better look or smell. A standing bear is usually curious, not threatening.⁣⁣

The National Park Service also issued the following statement.

P.S. We apologize to any “friends” who were brought on a hike as the “bait” or were sacrificed to save the group. You will be missed. ⁣⁣
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For more tips on how to stay safe in bear country, click here.